This is the first book in a series which should be read before continuing with the second book, "The Little Old Lady who Broke all the Rules". The Swedish author has an interesting premise that old people are invisible in public. She uses that idea to show how a group of old age pensioners, fed up with life in a retirement home, turn to crime - robbing an art gallery of a painting - with hopes of being caught so that they can live in a Swedish prison which they view as being a better place to live - better food, daily exercise, and no behavior enhancement drugs. The ensuing plot provides amusing details of the planning, the preparations, the stealing of the painting, and the outcome. Of course, because of their age, the guards and the police don't suspect these old age pensioners of being the criminals. The author embeds descriptions that are stereotypical of old people's deteriorating physical and mental abilities which turn out to be funny because they are the cause of the group's success in stealing the painting as well as their failure in being able to hold onto the proceeds. What is most outrageous in the books in this series is that the old people are so successful in their crimes against the government (as they see it) because security and police officers don't think old people could be behind the thefts. The pensioners have good intentions of using the proceeds of their crime to improve the lives of the elderly in old age homes, but that plan too goes awry. An enjoyable read.

gloryb's rating:
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