Forbidden films

Forbidden films

the hidden legacy of Nazi film

DVD - 2018 | German
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Germany's Third Reich made 1,200 feature films. According to experts, some 100 of these were blatant Nazi propaganda. More than 40 of these films remain under lock and key. Director Felix interviews German film historians, archivists and filmgoers in an investigation of the power, and potential danger, of cinema when used for ideological purposes. Moeller shows how contentious these films remain, and how propaganda can retain its punch when presented to audiences susceptible to manipulation.

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tadcook
May 01, 2019

Not speaking German, I would rely on the subtitles, but unfortunately for much of the film they are invisible. The subtitles all use white lettering, often against a white background, and there seems to be no way to reliably read them. Frequently there is a man talking, and most of the subtitles are projected against his white shirt! Sometimes some of the text is visible on the right side of the screen. But the rest? What does it say? A running commentary for the visually impaired might be useful.

a
akirakato
Mar 01, 2019

Written and directed by Felix Moeller in 2014, this 94-minute documentary looks into some of 1,200 feature films made in Germany's Third Reich.
Utilizing clips from the films and recorded discussions from public screenings in Munich, Berlin, Paris and Jerusalem, Moeller shows how contentious these 70-year-old films remain, and how propaganda can retain its punch when presented to audiences susceptible to manipulation.
Compelling and fascinating for both film and history buffs!

m
ManMachine
Feb 12, 2019

Are you ready for "Forbidden Films"??

This very surprising and equally shocking documentary looks at the hate films that the Nazis gleefully produced (against the Brits, French, and Jews) in the years from 1933-1945.

Impressively directed by Felix Moeller - "Forbidden Films" is definitely a historically significant presentation that shows viewers what incredible lengths the Nazis went to in order to purposely manipulate the German people and ignite their prejudices against their so-called "enemies".

Yes. When viewing clips of these devious propaganda films today (70+ years later), they often do come across as being downright laughable - But, when they were initially screened for their German audiences, they left an undeniable impact on these people that convinced them to vent their hate on their intended targets without conscience.

m
maipenrai
Oct 28, 2018

Unlike "Hitler's Hollywood" which focuses on a large sample of the approximate 1200 films produced while the Nazis were in power, this documentary deals with the ethics of viewing the more powerful / offensive features like "Jew Suss", "I Accuse" ( euthanasia ), "Hitler Youth Quex", "The Rothschilds", "Uncle Kruger", " The Eternal Jew" and "Stukas". The debates are set largely in Germany and Israel. The moral dilemma is whether banning the films is another form of fascism akin to the book burning vs. the fear that viewing the movies will encourage neo-nazis and wrongly influence young children. They also discuss that some of the films have had Nazi imagery edited out. Not surprisingly it was difficult to have a consensus. There was an almost universal agreement that editing was not the path. Many felt the films should be available to pre-teen children only with guided discussions. Others felt the films had no value at all and should be banned. Some thought they should be shown on television. See what you think by watching this excellent documentary. It is not an easy moral issue. Recommended. Kristi & Abby Tabby

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